The Angry Corrie 17: Feb-Mar 1994


BRIGHT TOO SOON...

TAC doesn't often repeat things things, but occasionally a matter of such import comes up that it needs a second telling. So, at risk of pre-empting the letters page, let it be known that there is now an anti-superquarry opposition group. This is based near the proposed Durness site, but opposes all the schemings of that self-styled west coast champion, Iain Wilson. Associate Membership costs a mere '2, and is available from Jim Andrews, Blanakiel, Durness, by Lairg, Sutherland. Tel:0971-5112780. TAC has paid its dues; so, hopefully, will its readers.

Your editor's brother-in-law is a qualified pilot, who practises at home using a flight simulator called ATP. This naturally includes virtual mock-ups of things you want to avoid whilst slewing around British airspace: Gorms, Lochaber, Southern Uplands, even Snowdonia. But the area between the Solway and Morecambe Bay is completely flat: apparently you could chuckyeager your way across it at head height without danger of crashing into any fells or pikes. But then we've been saying that all along...

Ever since TAC10, the subject of Boring-Squares / White Holes has rarely been long absent from these pages. So much so that you'd think there was nothing more to be said. But no: into our possession has come a copy of Uppdraettir Islands Blad 86 - better known to you and me as Icelandic OS Sheet 86. This is on a scale of 1:100 000, and covers the splendidly-named area of Norolingalago. And it is possibly the ultimate in White Holes, as something like 99.999% of the sheet is taken up with the Vatnajokull Glacier - which, although it has contours, presumably moves about a fair bit so doesn't count. The other 0.001% consists of a tiny mound jutting 110m above the level of the iceflow, along with an even smaller scratch of land just to the northwest. We would include a picture of all this, but we'd only bore you.

A little knowledge... Avid TAC reader returns from her trekking holiday in Nepal, and on Monday morning dutifully treks back into work. "Where've you been then?" asks well- meaning colleague. "Kathmandu." "Is that by Oban?" comes the ingenuous reply...


TAC 17 Index